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Thursday, May 21, 2020 | History

2 edition of antebellum tariff on cotton revisited found in the catalog.

antebellum tariff on cotton revisited

Douglas A. Irwin

antebellum tariff on cotton revisited

by Douglas A. Irwin

  • 47 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cotton manufacture -- United States -- History -- 19th century.,
  • Tariff on cotton -- United States -- History -- 19th century.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesTariff on cotton revisited
    StatementDouglas A. Irwin, Peter Temin.
    SeriesNBER working paper series -- no. 7825, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 7825.
    ContributionsTemin, Peter., National Bureau of Economic Research.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination27 p. :
    Number of Pages27
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22405491M

    The Antebellum Tariff on Cotton Textiles Revisited. Downloads (,) Citation 2. The Antebellum Tariff on Cotton Textiles Revisited. NBER Working Paper No. w Number of pages: 29 Posted: Douglas A. Irwin, Forrest Capie, Samuel Gregg, Michael Brown and Ronald Stewart-Brown. Abstract Throughout U.S. history, import tariffs have been put on a sustained downward path in only two instances: from the early s until the Civil War and from the mid‐s to the present. This paper analyzes the political economy of tariff reductions in the antebellum period. Tariff politics was highly sectional: the North supported high tariffs, the South favored low tariffs, and the Cited by: 5.

    Antebellum Tariff Politics: Regional Coalitions and Shifting Economic Interests Douglas A. Irwin Dartmouth College Abstract Throughout U.S. history, import tariffs have been put on a sustained downward path in only two instances: from the early s . the antebellum tariff: different products or competing sources? a comment on irwin and temin - volume 61 issue 3 - c. knick harleyCited by: 9.

    The Cotton Economy in the South. Sources. The Cotton Boom. While the pace of industrialization picked up in the North in the s, the agricultural economy of the slave South grew, if anything, more entrenched. In the decade before the Civil War cotton prices rose more than 50 percent, to cents a pound. Booming cotton prices stimulated. The decade of the s witnessed various schemes to expand the American empire of slavery. The Ostend Manifesto articulated the right of the United States to forcefully seize Cuba if Spain would not sell it, while filibuster expeditions attempted to annex new .


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Antebellum tariff on cotton revisited by Douglas A. Irwin Download PDF EPUB FB2

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Antebellum Tariff on Cotton Textiles 3 Stettler, Growth and Fluctuations, p. 4 See Temin, “Industrialization of New England.” 5 As Table 1 indicates, the Tariff of had a minimum valuation of 30 cents per yard of printed cloth and 20 cents per yard of white cloth. According to U.S. import statistics, the value of printed, stained, or colored cotton manufactures from Britain.

The Antebellum Tariff on Cotton Textiles Revisited Douglas A. Irwin, Peter Temin. NBER Working Paper No. Issued in August NBER Program(s):Program on the Development of the American Economy, International Trade and Investment Program Recent research has suggested that the antebellum U.S.

cotton textile industry would have been wiped out had it not received tariff by: Antebellum tariff on cotton revisited book this from a library. The antebellum tariff on cotton textiles revisited. [Douglas A Irwin; Peter Temin]. The Antebellum Tariff On Cotton Textiles Revisited Article in The Journal of Economic History 61(03) February with 37 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

THE ANTEBELLUM TARIFF ON COTTON TEXTILES REVISITED - Volume 61 Issue 3 - Douglas A. Irwin, Peter TeminCited by: The Antebellum Tariff on Cotton Textiles Consolidation Last revised 4/4/ HEIKKI RANTAKARI Recent research on the importance of the antebellum tariff for the survival of the American cotton textile industry has come into highly conflicting conclusions.

By examining both theFile Size: KB. Downloadable. Recent research has suggested that the U.S. cotton-textile industry would have been wiped out had it not received tariff protection throughout the antebellum period. We reaffirm Taussig's earlier judgment that the U.S.

cotton-textile industry was largely independent of the tariff by the early s. American and British producers specialized in quite different types of textile.

Downloadable. Recent research has suggested that the antebellum U.S. cotton textile industry would have been wiped out had it not received tariff protection. We reaffirm Taussig's judgment that the U.S. cotton textile industry was largely independent of the tariff by the s.

American and British producers specialized in quite different types of textile products that were poor substitutes. Irwin and Temin: w The Antebellum Tariff on Cotton Textiles Revisited: Davis and Irwin: w The Antebellum U.S. Iron Industry: Domestic Production and Foreign Competition: Irwin and Davis: w Trade Disruptions and America's Early Industrialization: Irwin: w New Estimates of the Average Tariff of the United States, Scheve and Slaughter: w What Determines Individual.

the Ame rican cotton industry could have survived the removal of the tariff in the antebellum years, but it would have done so only if the rem oval of the ta riff resulted in a considerableAuthor: Knick Harley.

The Hamilton Tariff of was the second statute ever enacted by the new United States government. Most of the rates of the tariff were between five and ten percent, depending on the value of the item. As Secretary of the Treasury, Alexander Hamilton was anxious to establish the tariff as a regular source of revenue for the government and as a protection of domestic manufacture.

In the antebellum era—that is, in the years before the Civil War—American planters in the South continued to grow Chesapeake tobacco and Carolina rice as they had in the colonial era.

Cotton, however, emerged as the antebellum South’s major commercial crop, eclipsing tobacco, rice, and sugar in economic importance.

Bythe region was producing two-thirds of the world’s cotton. Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): (external link)Author: Douglas A.

Irwin and Peter Temin. Source: Douglas Irwin & Peter Temin, “The Antebellum Tariff on Cotton Textiles Revisited,” Journal of Economic History: Vol Number 3 () * To support this blog, buy my books at my Amazon Author Page.

The Confederacy at Flood Tide by Philip Leigh Trading With the Enemy by Philip Leigh. The economic response to the Chinese tariff will be an increase in cotton demand and the corresponding effect of an underlying support for cotton prices around the world. As we wrote a couple of months ago, the U.S.

cotton industry has always supported fair trade. The Antebellum Tariff on Cotton Textiles Revisited (with Peter Temin), Journal of Economic History 61 (September ): Tariffs and Growth in Late Nineteenth Century America, The World Economy 24 (January ): Ironically, the antebellum South’s quest for economic independence via slave-produced cotton made the culture more dependent than ever on outside economies.

Approximately 75% of cotton produced in the South was exported abroad, but this system required mass. The American antebellum tariff provided high levels of protection to most of American manufacturing.

Yet most economic historians have concluded that the tariff had a modest effect on American industrialization in part because of terms of trade improvements arising from America's dominance as Cited by:   Douglas A. Irwin and Peter Temin, “The Antebellum Tariff on Cotton Textiles Revisited,” Journal of Economic History, Septemberpp.

– Ibid. Jude Wanniski, The Way the World Works: How Economies Fail—and Succeed (New York: Basic Books, ).Author: Larry Schweikart. Some cotton, corn, sorghum, pork to be retaliatory tariff free A to tons of U.S.

cotton has been approved by China U.S. Trade Representatives Head to China for Face-to-Face Talks.The rise of tariff rates from the lowest at 15% to the highest at 55% causes cotton prices to fall from 35 cents per pound to about 5 cents per pound.

That is an eighty-five percent drop in income for the southern cotton plantations.Vol. 61, No. 3, Sep., Published by: The Antebellum Tariff on Cotton Textiles Revisited. The Antebellum Tariff on Cotton Textiles Revisited (pp. ) Book Reviews. Ancient and Medieval. From the Brink of the Apocalypse: Confronting Famine, War, Plague.